Tuesday, May 9, 2017

Caught On Tape: Reporter Assaulted Live On Air During Humanitarian Refugee Story

If you happen to be visiting Rome, Italy anytime soon (or pretty much any Western European country), then you may want to come prepared with pepper spray or other self defense tools, because as you’ll see in the video below, peaceful refugees looking to culturally enhance Europe aren’t always as friendly as you may think.
Italian television correspondent Francesca Parisella was doing a live broadcast about the plight of refugees at the central train station in Rome, when she and her camera crew were attacked by migrants who had sought shelter for the night.
Ms. Parisella was able to find safety with a Taxi driver who happened to be in the area, but the cameraman was not so lucky. According to reports, he was beaten and his camera destroyed:
Google Translated From Il Giornale Via Vlad Tepes:

Just as Nicola Porro connects at around 23.30, with his post at Rome Termini Station, to document the situation of the bivouacs that populate her at night, Francesca Parisella has the time to start the connection and then warn “we have been assaulted “. The room swings, it is understood that the journalist and operator are fleeing, and the voice of the chronicler rises up to become a real scream of fear. A few minutes later, studio studio explains that “Francesca is upset but she is okay, they have destroyed the camera and hacked the operator.” One like that of this evening It should not be a reportage in the war zone. “Thanks to a taxi driver, if not It would be much worse. ” A version confirmed by Parisella himself, on the phone, shortly afterwards: “We were away to tell what kind of hospitality we can give, are bothered and attacked. They rushed me and taken to my jacket,” the reporter said.


Such scenes are now playing out regularly in once quiet, peaceful and crime free areas of Europe. While politicians and the mainstream media either downplays or completely ignores such reports, the fact is that the cultural enrichment being forecibly injected into Europe is leading to increased sexual attacks, violent assaults and large-scale terrorist attacks. In fact, it’s so scary for citizens of the countries accepting refugees that Germany actually sold out of pepper spray and Europeans have been scrambling to acquire self defense firearms.
While the common denominator is clearly the influx of immigrants from countries that are so culturally and religiously different from Europe that there is simply no way a peaceful assimilation is possible, anyone who dares mention the reality of the situation is branded a racist, a nationalist or a fear monger. In fact, in Germany, you can now be arrested and have your children taken from you by the government if you criticize refugees – that’s how bad it’s gotten.
One Angry Foreigner had enough and took to the airwaves to explain how mass migration has led to fear and crisis across Sweden:
t appears that all over the world, most notably in present-day Western Europe, immigrants from countries with completely different world views and legal perceptions are moving in and pushing their agendas on the natives, often with full support from their elected representatives and their media mouthpieces.

In an incredibly insightful opinion piece from an Angry Foreigner living in Sweden, we learn that it’s not just Americans who are fed up with the political correctness being forced upon the people by politicians, feminists, cultural groups, and immigrants themselves.

As you watch the video you’ll no doubt notice some key parallels between Europe and the United States. For all intents and purposes you could swap out the word “Swedes” for “Americans” and the points being made still ring true.
I have never come across a country where nationalism is one of the biggest taboos… to the point where it’s considered to be racism.

Because if you love your own country and your own culture the most then you don’t love other peoples’ as much and that’s not equal. That’s not progressive.

Nationalism is only ugly when Swedes express it.

When immigrants express a desire, a will to preserve their identity and their culture then it’s charming because, remember, they are the ones with the culture… not the Swedes.
Watch the full video:
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Saturday, May 6, 2017

Medical Studies Are Almost Always Bogus

How many times have you encountered a study — on, say, weight loss — that trumpeted one fad, only to see another study discrediting it a week later?

That’s because many medical studies are junk. It’s an open secret in the research community, and it even has a name: “the reproducibility crisis.”

For any study to have legitimacy, it must be replicated, yet only half of medical studies celebrated in newspapers hold water under serious follow-up scrutiny — and about two-thirds of the “sexiest” cutting-edge reports, including the discovery of new genes linked to obesity or mental illness, are later “disconfirmed.”

Though erring is a key part of the scientific process, this level of failure slows scientific progress, wastes time and resources and costs taxpayers excesses of $28 billion a year, writes NPR science correspondent Richard Harris in his book “Rigor Mortis: How Sloppy Science Creates Worthless Cures, Crushes Hope, and Wastes Billions” (Basic Books).

“When you read something, take it with a grain of salt,” Harris tells The Post. “Even the best science can be misleading, and often what you’re reading is not the best science.”

Take one particularly enraging example: For many years research on breast cancer was conducted on misidentified melanoma cells, which means that thousands of papers published in credible scientific journals were actually studying the wrong cancer. “It’s impossible to know how much this sloppy use of the wrong cells has set back research into breast cancer,” writes Harris.

Another study claimed to have invented a blood test that could detect ovarian cancer — which would mean much earlier diagnosis. The research was hailed as a major breakthrough on morning shows and in newspapers. Further scrutiny, though, revealed the only reason the blood test “worked” was because the researchers tested the two batches on two separate days — all the women with ovarian cancer on one day, and without the disease the next. Instead of measuring the differences in the cancer, the blood test had, in fact, measured the day-to-day differences in the machine.

So why are so many tests bogus? Harris has some thoughts.

For one, science is hard. Everything from unconscious bias — the way researchers see their data through the rosy lens of their own theses — to the types of beaker they use or the bedding that they keep mice in can cloud results and derail reproducibility.

Then there is the funding issue. During the heyday of the late ’90s and early aughts, research funding increased until Congress decided to hold funding flat for the next decade, creating an atmosphere of intense, some would say unhealthy, competition among research scientists. Now only 17 percent of grants get funded (compared to a third three decades ago). Add this to the truly terrible job market for post-docs — only 21 percent land tenure track jobs — and there is a greater incentive to publish splashy counterintuitive studies, which have a higher likelihood of being wrong, writes Harris.

One effect of this “pressure to publish” situation is intentional data manipulation, where scientists cherry-pick the information that supports a hypothesis while ignoring the data that doesn’t — an all too common problem in academic research, writes Harris.

“There’s a constant scramble for research dollars. Promotions and tenure depend on making splashy discoveries. There are big rewards for being first, even if the work ultimately fails the test of time,” writes Harris.
This will only get worse if funding is cut further — something that seems inevitable under proposed federal tax cuts. “It only exacerbates the problems. With so many scientists fighting for a shrinking pool of money, cuts will only make all of these issues worse,” Harris says.

Luckily, there is a growing group of people working to expose the ugly side of how research is done. One of them is Stanford professor John Ioannidis, considered one of the heroes of the reproducibility movement. He’s written extensively on the topic, including a scathing paper titled “Why Most Published Scientific Research Findings Are False.”

He’s found, for example, out of tens of thousands of papers touting discoveries of specific genes linked to everything from depression to obesity, only 1.2 percent had truly positive results. Meanwhile, Dr. Ioannidis followed 49 studies that had been cited at least a thousand times — of which seven had been “flatly contradicted” by further research. This included one that claimed estrogen and progestin benefited women after hysterectomies “when in fact the drug combination increased the risk of heart disease and breast cancer.”

Other organizations like Retraction Watch, which tracks discredited studies in real time, and the Cochrane group, an independent network of researchers that pushes for evidence-based medicine, act as industry watchdogs. There is also an internal push for scientists to make their data public so it’s easier to police bad science.

The public can play a role, too. “If we curb our enthusiasm a bit,” Harris writes, “scientists will be less likely to run headlong after dubious ideas.”

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Wednesday, May 3, 2017

The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse: Taxes, Corruption (Politics/Rule of Law), Propaganda, War

When the news turns to propaganda, it is one of the last things to take place in the historical sequence of how civilization falls. The mainstream media is the third horseman of economic Apocalypse – Taxes – Corruption  (Politics/Rule of Law) – Propaganda – War.

*(First you have the taxes, then comes the corruption to bribe politicians to get out of the taxes and they use the courts to extract taxes, then comes the propaganda of the media to manipulate society to hold on to power, and then finally comes the war (civil unrest/international).

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